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Hinsdale Village Board OKs raising home to avoid flooding

Mark Marcucci says the basement and first floor his house on Glendale Avenue flooded in 2010 and again last April, causing $100,000s of damage. The house, where he raised his six children, was built by his father-in-law. "The decision to stay is there," he says. |  Kim Fornek/Sun-Times Media
Aug. 21, 2013
Mark Marcucci says the basement and first floor his house on Glendale Avenue flooded in 2010 and again last April, causing $100,000s of damage. The house, where he raised his six children, was built by his father-in-law. "The decision to stay is there," he says. | Kim Fornek/Sun-Times Media Aug. 21, 2013

The Hinsdale Village Board gave a resident the go-ahead Oct. 15 to raise his house 3 feet to protect it from flooding from Salt Creek.

Mark Marcucci previously reported his house at 14 E. Glendale Ave. had flooded in 2010 and in April of this year, when water filled the basement and reached a depth of 5 inches on the first floor. This despite the fact that when he built the house in 1998, he included underground stormwater detention that holds about 151,000 gallons.

At a public hearing in August held before the Zoning Board of Appeals, some neighbors of Marcucci, who lives just west of York Road and south of the creek, protested his plan because they fear it will cause more flooding on their property.

Marcucci’s lawyer, Scott Day, said the house complies with all federal, county and local stormwater regulations.

When questioned by Village President Thomas Cauley, Jr., Thomas Burke of the Christopher Burke engineering firm said if Marcucci raises his house beyond the reach of floodwater, the water that would have gone in his home and basement will be evenly distributed across the Salt Creek floodplain. The increase would be about 1/100 of a foot, “basically zero change,” Burke said.

“Based on our analysis, I can competently say there is no impact on surrounding properties,” Burke said.

Dan Deeter, the village engineer, said he agreed with Burke’s conclusions.

Marcucci needed village approval for a height variance, because if raised, the house would exceed the village’s 30-foot height limit by about 3 feet.

Perry Accettura, who lives on Birchwood, to the south of the Marcuccis, had a lawyer explain his concerns about increased flooding at the public hearing in August. Accettura attended the Village Board meeting, but chose not to address the board because he said he thought it was pointless. The ZBA already had recommended the Village Board approve the height variance.

The Village Board voted unanimously to approve the height variation.

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